George Bush and his lemonparty.

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Yeah, I went there.

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3 Responses to “George Bush and his lemonparty.”

  1. George Bush » George Bush and his lemonparty. Says:

    […] Jason P wrote an interesting post today on George Bush and his lemonparty.Here’s a quick excerptPhotobucket. Yeah, I went there. […]

  2. Paul Says:

    , George W.’s ominous wairnng to those responsible for 911 spoke literally from on top of the burning embers of the twin towers during the middle of hopeless rescue efforts is his finest moment as President. I believe history will record it as such.For me, Barack Obama’s most memorable speech is the civil rights speech he made during the 2008 campaign. It was inspiring, like Martin Luther King, Jr.’s I Have a Dream speech. I never felt the same about Obama when, five weeks later, he jettisoned Reverend Wright like so much dead weight to improve his chances to get elected.

  3. Riko Says:

    This reminds me of the line “He who mairers the spirit of the age will find himself a widower in the next”. Science fiction, with its extrapolations of current trends into the future, tends to pick up on things that are less long-term trends than they are short-term fads, since it can be very hard to tell the two apart with only a couple years’ data. Out of every group of the 10 Next Big Things, 9 of them usually turn out to be short-lived flashes in the pan. Unfortunately, those duds tend to find there way into science-fiction movies.What they miss is the large degree of cultural continuity over long periods- e.g., if you dress today like Hugh Beaumont’s Ward Cleaver did on Leave it to Beaver, nobody will think there is anything odd about your appearance, though you might get a compliment or two for going to the trouble of putting on a jacket and tie. Heck, a man in his ’20s today could wear his great-grandfather’s suit from 1925, and while he might come off a little formal or slightly eccentric, people would still generally agree that he was very well-dressed, because there just hasn’t been much fundamental change to the formal-level sartorial standard for men in the past 90 years. The tuxedo has been standard since at least the 1890s, and is still popular at the 2013 Oscars. Women’s fashions have changed a lot more, of course, because women are more fashion-conscious, and also because feminism launched a war against anything too redolent of traditional femininity.Incidentally, I watched “Star Wars” many times as a child, but it was only as an adult that I realized how much it positively reeked of the Disco Epoch in which it was born. The shaggy haircuts, the open collars, the Billy Dee Williams… not to mention the aura of decaying rustiness that George Lucas insisted on having his prop crews create. In envisioning this “used future”, were they echoing Carter-era malaise, when you couldn’t buy gas for your shoddily-made car? In contrast, the Prequels are bright and clean… and nothing but completely fake computer trickery, much like the easy prosperity of the Clinton-Bush II years. Anyway, I probably shouldn’t speculate more than that, since I have a rule that states that “Nobody over the age of 12 is allowed to take Star Wars seriously”.

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